Excerpts from the Derry Journal archive

'Miss Greencastle' Maria Farren pictured with prizewinners in the fancy dress competition at the Greencastle Regatta.

'Miss Greencastle' Maria Farren pictured with prizewinners in the fancy dress competition at the Greencastle Regatta.

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From the ‘Journal’ of Friday, August 25, 1989

Derry man’s hard work for Kilburn Irish

Waterside SDLP councillor Gerry Toland pictured alongside a row of derelict houses at Ashcroft Place in the Top of the Hill area of the city.

Waterside SDLP councillor Gerry Toland pictured alongside a row of derelict houses at Ashcroft Place in the Top of the Hill area of the city.

Elderly people living in London’s Kilburn district can look forward to receiving super food hampers this Christmas thanks to the fund-raising efforts of 26-year-old Derry man Chris Mullan.

Chris, a trainee social worker with Brent Social Services, is an enthusiastic member of the committee of the Irish Centre in Kilburn, and every year he organises the delivery food hampers to elderly people - many of the them with Irish connections.

This Christmas, Chris has plans to deliver more than 1,000 hampers to senior citizens.

A host of fund-raising activities, including an 18 hour sponsored ‘Irish Jig’ in Kilburn Square, have been organised to finance the hamper effort.

Castle Bar lads in sponsored cycle run to Sligo and back again

This weekend will see the start of a two-day sponsored cycle run by a small team of Derry cyclists, from Derry to Sligo and back, in aid of local charities.

The team comprises three representatives from the Castle Bar and they will set off on Sunday morning on the long push to Sligo, hoping to arrive there later that evening.

Bar manager John Bell, along with Kevin O’Leary and Gary McLaughlin, have been in training for some months now.

Seventy derelict houses in Top of the Hill

SDLP councillor Gerry Toland has criticised the Northern Ireland Housing Executive for failing to take adequate steps to deal with the problem of derelict property in Derry’s Top of the Hill district.

According to Colr Toland, the Housing Executive had said the houses in question, which were vacated during the early days of the ‘Troubles’, would be refurbished as part of a renovation project.

So far, however, he said, no renovation had taken place.

From the ‘Journal’ of Friday, August 21, 1964

Derry ‘the city in a playground’

Derry, “the city in a playground”, with a population of 150,000 in 20 years and capable of expansion to 250,000 over the next century - that’s the plan put forward by Mr Geoffrey Copcutt (Stormont Ministry of Development).

Mr Copcutt offers to prepare a masterplan for promoting the North West and suggests that there are a number of lively organisations and individuals in the area who could be harnessed to this opportunity.

“The fate of Londonderry in the post-war years is one of the signs by which posterity will judge us,” he said. “It cannot survive on slogans.”

Derry, suggests Mr. Copcutt, could be known as “the city in a playground”. Access to Lough Foyle, the possibility of regional parkland together with the general proximity to mountains and coast, plus clean air and absence of blight, were, he said, factors which could be exploited to create a formidable attraction.

‘Shocking’ shortage of pitches for Sunday football

The shortage of playing pitches in Derry again came under fire at the annual meeting of the Derry & District Football Association, when the secretary, John McCafferty, in the course of his annual report, commented: “It is shocking to realise that, in a city the size of Derry, only two football pitches are available for Sunday games - one junior and one juvenile.

“But, worse still, is the fact that there will not be any pitch available on a Sunday for juvenile football during the 1964-65 season.”

New church fronts on the sea

Dr. Neil Farren, Bishop of Derry, will dedicate and open the new church of Our Lady, Star of the Sea, at Desertegney, in the Buncrana parish, on Sunday next.

The new church, which is designed to seat 400 people, is built in concrete block with cavity walls externally roughcast. The cost of the entire contract, seating, altar and furnishings and stained glass, was £33,000.

Derry, “the city in a playground”, with a population of 150,000 in 20 years and capable of expansion to 250,000 over the next century - that’s the plan put forward by Mr Geoffrey Copcutt (Stormont Ministry of Development).

Mr Copcutt offers to prepare a masterplan for promoting the North West and suggests that there are a number of lively organisations and individuals in the area who could be harnessed to this opportunity.

“The fate of Londonderry in the post-war years is one of the signs by which posterity will judge us,” he said. “It cannot survive on slogans.”

Derry, suggests Mr. Copcutt, could be known as “the city in a playground”. Access to Lough Foyle, the possibility of regional parkland together with the general proximity to mountains and coast, plus clean air and absence of blight, were, he said, factors which could be exploited to create a formidable attraction.

‘Shocking’ shortage of pitches for Sunday football

The shortage of playing pitches in Derry again came under fire at the annual meeting of the Derry & District Football Association, when the secretary, John McCafferty, in the course of his annual report, commented: “It is shocking to realise that, in a city the size of Derry, only two football pitches are available for Sunday games - one junior and one juvenile.

“But, worse still, is the fact that there will not be any pitch available on a Sunday for juvenile football during the 1964-65 season.”

New church fronts on the sea

Dr. Neil Farren, Bishop of Derry, will dedicate and open the new church of Our Lady, Star of the Sea, at Desertegney, in the Buncrana parish, on Sunday next.

The new church, which is designed to seat 400 people, is built in concrete block with cavity walls externally roughcast. The cost of the entire contract, seating, altar and furnishings and stained glass, was £33,000.