VIDEO: Carrie remembered in fourth annual Walk for Autism Acceptance

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Hundreds of local families have gathered in Derry for the fourth annual Walk for Autism Acceptance, in memory of Circle of Support co-founder Carrie Coyle.

A brief silence was held at the start of the walk over the Peace Bridge in honour of Carrie, who died suddenly in January at the age of 36.

REMEMBERING CARRIE!. . . .Morgan Coyle (front centre), daughter of the late Carrie Coyle pictured with committee members and local politicians before the start of yesterday morning's COS for Autism Families Walk across the Peace Bridge. The fourth annual walk, saw hundreds join in the walk. Morgan led a short pause on the bridge before the start of the event. DER1315MC063

REMEMBERING CARRIE!. . . .Morgan Coyle (front centre), daughter of the late Carrie Coyle pictured with committee members and local politicians before the start of yesterday morning's COS for Autism Families Walk across the Peace Bridge. The fourth annual walk, saw hundreds join in the walk. Morgan led a short pause on the bridge before the start of the event. DER1315MC063

The song ‘Say Something (I’m Giving Up On You)’ was played over the loud speakers during the poignant event, while bubbles were also released into the air by many of those gathered.

Carrie’s teenage daughter was among those who led the large gathering from Ebrington Square over the bridge and back on Saturday, with blue flags, large blue flowers and banners held aloft.

Carrie’s friend and fellow C.O.S. co-founder Caroline Roddy told the Journal: “This was always Carrie’s brainchild so we are doing a wee remembrance, taking a moment to remember her, but she is never forgotten.

“C.O.S. was Carrie’s baby. She wanted it to be about awareness to start off wit but it moved on to acceptance as the group grew and grew.

Carrie Coyle, who died tragically in January.

Carrie Coyle, who died tragically in January.

“It’s all about getting people aware of how many families are affected but also about accepting the fact these children are different but they are children first. You have to see past the autism.”

The fourth annual Circle of Support Walk for Autism Acceptance on its return leg via the Peace Bridge.

The fourth annual Circle of Support Walk for Autism Acceptance on its return leg via the Peace Bridge.

Some of the crowds who took part in the fourth annual walk.

Some of the crowds who took part in the fourth annual walk.