Anne’s Shelter on display as Turner Gallery reopens in Derry

Anne Tallentire, Shelter
Anne Tallentire, Shelter

The art gallery in Ebrington Square which was purpose built for the Turner Prize in 2013, has finally reopened in Derry.

Irish artist Anne Tallentire will showcase ‘Shelter’ - art representing both the historical and contemporary significance of the Nissen Hut.

The second in a series of diagrams by Irish artist Anne Tallentire  as part of her major new work Shelter, co-commissioned by the Nerve Centre and 14-18 NOW, the UKs arts programme for the First World War centenary.

The second in a series of diagrams by Irish artist Anne Tallentire as part of her major new work Shelter, co-commissioned by the Nerve Centre and 14-18 NOW, the UKs arts programme for the First World War centenary.

It will be the first time an artist has exhibited in the newly named Nerve Visual Gallery, which has lay empty since the end of the Derry’s reign as City of Culture in 2013.

On Saturday Anne began the first of a series of seven works which have been displayed individually each day on the parade ground at Ebrington.

Each evening at 8 p.m. the work is collected, returned to building Eighty81, and displayed in Gallery Two which now functions as an open studio.

Today Anne will display the fifth part of the project in Ebrington, and on Saturday will create the seventh and final part of Shelter.

The Irish artist said it’s wonderful to be the first artist in the gallery since artist Laure Prouvost, one of her former students, scooped the Turner crown in 2013.

“I love the rich cultural heritage you find in Derry,” Anne told the ‘Journal.’ “Derry has always been good for Art.

“The Orchard Gallery here was world class, and was one of the most significant spaces, not only nationally, but internationally.”

And for Anne the same is true today.

“In this relatively small city you have absolutely top class art galleries,” she said.

“The Centre for Contemporary Art (CCA) and The Void are internationally recognised spaces.

“They are absolutely top class galleries and that is something to be celebrated. I love Derry and I love its rich cultural heritage, but it is contemporary as well.”

To create Shelter, Anne worked in partnership with award winning architect Grainne Hassett who came on board as a collaborative consultant.

“I wanted make a link in art between the Nissen hut and a contemporary shelter,” said Anne. “But not one made with all the military wealth and expertise of an army, but one made by volunteers, by people who would want to help.

“After months and months of research people were asking me if I was going to build a shelter.

“No I am not. But I am going to get all the materials and build an artwork that speaks about shelter.”

To make the art come to life, Anne praised the team of volunteers that have helped her, from the Nerve centre.

Shelter is curated by Nerve Centre, Declan Sheehan, 14-18 NOW and Tamsin Dillon, and has been made in consultation with award-winning architect Grainne Hassett.

Shelter is one of four major events and new commissions taking place across Northern Ireland in 2016, as part of the 14-18 NOW programme for the First World War centenary.

The artwork will be on display in the Nerve Visual Gallery until July 31.