App’s the way to do it at St Mary’s College

SUCCESS FOR ST. MARY'S!. . . . .St. Mary's College students, fresh from their success at the wiCadet App Camp Challenge 2015 at the University of Ulster, Coleraine on Friday where they were winners in the 'Most Commercially Viable App'. Pictured front from left are students, Aishling Hegarty, Megan Anderson, Rebecca Doherty and Megan Kelly. At back from left are Ms. Aine King,and  Ms. Heather McGee.  DER0415MC004

SUCCESS FOR ST. MARY'S!. . . . .St. Mary's College students, fresh from their success at the wiCadet App Camp Challenge 2015 at the University of Ulster, Coleraine on Friday where they were winners in the 'Most Commercially Viable App'. Pictured front from left are students, Aishling Hegarty, Megan Anderson, Rebecca Doherty and Megan Kelly. At back from left are Ms. Aine King,and Ms. Heather McGee. DER0415MC004

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These are the five St Mary’s College students girls who’ve just scooped a major award for an app they made to assist patients in hospital.

Shelby McElwee, Megan Kelly, Rebecca Doherty, Megan Anderson and Aisling Hegarty teamed up to win the Wi Cadet University of Ulster award for ‘Most Commercially Viable App.”

The girls beat off stiff competition from eleven other teams to take the prize which includes a Galaxy Surface Tablet for each of them.

Shelby McElwee from the team explained how they had decided to create an app exclusively for patients after checking out health apps in the app store.

“There were 11 apps for doctors,” she said.

“But our app lets patients control a buzzer from their phone to alert doctors and nurses when they need help.

“It also stores a drop down menu of breakfasts, lunch and dinners so patients can select what they want.

“The app contains the details of the patient’s next of kin and in the case of an emergency the app actually rings that person’s number.

“The water intake of patients in also measured in the app so doctors can see how much water a patient has taken.

“If they have only take 1-2 glasses this will alert medics that this is not enough.”

The girls made their app using App Inventor II and a coding system.

They were mentored by teacher Heather McGee and IT technician Aine King who explained how the girls had stayed behind after school and given up their lunch breaks to work on the project.