Bloody Sunday: ‘No one gave my brother 24 hours notice about what was going to happen’

Mickey McKinney, whose brother William was killed on Bloody Sunday, stands beside a mural in the Bogside area of Londonderry, Northern Ireland. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday November 20, 2013. See PA story ULSTER Troubles. Photo credit should read: Paul Faith/PA Wire
Mickey McKinney, whose brother William was killed on Bloody Sunday, stands beside a mural in the Bogside area of Londonderry, Northern Ireland. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday November 20, 2013. See PA story ULSTER Troubles. Photo credit should read: Paul Faith/PA Wire
  • Lawyers for seven former Para’s are seeking a judicial review
  • ’Lance Corporal J’ was released on bail on Wednesday night
  • 14 people were shot dead on Bloody Sunday

The brother of man shot dead by a member of the British Parachute Regiment has said that he believes there should be no ‘preferential treatment’ for ex-soldiers when faced with the prospect of arrest.

Michael McKinney, whose brother William, a former employee of the ‘Derry Journal’, was shot dead on Bloody Sunday was reacting to news that lawyers acting for seven former Para’s have made an application for judicial review.

The legal representatives for the soldiers have contended that they have concerns over the way the PSNI are conducting their murder investigation into the events of January 30, 1972 in Derry.

A 66-year-old former Paratrooper was arrested in County Antrim on Tuesday and was released on police bail on Wednesday night pending further enquiries. It is understood he was referred to as ‘Lance Corporal J’ during the Saville Inquiry and was questioned in relation to the killings of William Nash, Michael McDaid and John Young and was also quizzed about the wounding of Alexander Nash. Lawyers for soldiers B, N, O, Q, R, U and V have served emergency proceedings against the High Court in London asserting that the motivation behind the murder investigation is “politically motivated.”

It follows the realisation that if they are charged in relation to Bloody Sunday they may lose their status of anonymity.

The lawyers have also argued that it is illegal to arrest any soldiers at their homes without notice and take them to Northern Ireland for questioning. They have requested that the soldiers are given 24 hours notice so they can arrange to attend a local police station for questioning. Michael McKinney told the ‘Journal’: “We know that David Cameron said that the killings on Bloody Sunday were ‘unjustified and unjustifiable’, but we have always believed that our relatives were murdered. I welcome the fact that one soldier has been arrested and released on bail pending further enquiries, but it is my hope that many more arrests will take place over the coming weeks.

Marchers on January 30th, 1972, the day that would become known as Bloody Sunday.

Marchers on January 30th, 1972, the day that would become known as Bloody Sunday.

“Any soldier arrested on suspicion of murder must be treated like everyone else, that is equally under the law. Why do these people want preferential treatment?

“Of course they should be brought to Northern Ireland for questioning because that is where the crimes were committed. No one gave my brother or any of the other marchers on Bloody Sunday who were shot dead or wounded on Bloody Sunday 24 hours notice about what was going to happen to them.”