Buncrana woman’s exhibtion on the Troubles

Buncrana woman Triona White Hamilton is curator/co-ordinator of an exhibition that includes everyday items used in the conflict in and about Northern Ireland. The exhibition has been organised by cross-community organisation Healing Through Remembering (HTR) and is expected to tour Northern Ireland and the border counties in the new year. With Triona are HTR board members Alan McBride (left) and Oliver Wilkinson... and a binlid that was banged in protests in nationalist areas of Belfast during the conflict.
Buncrana woman Triona White Hamilton is curator/co-ordinator of an exhibition that includes everyday items used in the conflict in and about Northern Ireland. The exhibition has been organised by cross-community organisation Healing Through Remembering (HTR) and is expected to tour Northern Ireland and the border counties in the new year. With Triona are HTR board members Alan McBride (left) and Oliver Wilkinson... and a binlid that was banged in protests in nationalist areas of Belfast during the conflict.
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A Buncrana woman is showcasing an exhibition which focuses on items for used during the conflict in Northern Ireland.

Triona White Hamilton, from Dunree, is the co-ordinator of the project, entitled Everyday Objects Transformed by the Conflict, which has been launched by cross-community organisation, Healing Through Remembering. They focus on ways of dealing with the conflict, with the aim of achieving a peaceful future for all.

A preview of the show was held in Belfast earlier this year and it is hoped that a larger exhibition will tour Northern Ireland and the border counties between February and August next year.

Ms White Hamilton, who has worked for six years in the heritage sector, having started as a volunteer in the Derry Heritage and Museum Service, says: “This is one of the most important and challenging projects I have worked on. There were only a small number of exhibits at the preview, but we will be arranging to borrow a substantial number of items from various collectors for the main exhibition next year.

“We are also asking for suggestions on venues the exhibition might visit, and the format it might take.”

Kate Turner, director of Healing Through Remembering, said: “So many everyday items assumed a new significance during the conflict - like a coffee jar as a coffee-jar-bomb. And so many unusual things became everyday like people and bags being searched before entering a shop.

“These objects offer a glimpse into the everyday lives and memories of individuals, communities and organisations, and so hopefully will help people explore the nature, causes and effect of conflict.”

Items included in the pilot show in Belfast include a bin lid, which was used as a communication tool and a means of protest in

nationalist areas of Belfast, an armoured clipboard carried by police at vehicle checkpoints in ‘high-risk’ areas and a sponge badge worn by loyalists in protest at strike leaders being called “spongers” by the then British Prime Minister, Harold Wilson.

The collection also includes a tape recording by photojournalist Vincent Dargan of live transmissions from the pirate radio Station Radio Free Belfast, manned by Civil Rights and People’s Democracy members during 1969-70.

For more information or to suggest a suitable venue to host the exhibition, please contact Triona White Hamilton at Healing Through Remembering: 028 90238844 / exhibition@healing throughremembering.org