Fair’s fair in the trading game for Derry charity

From left, Marcy Mueller, Mark McMahon and Kelly Krinn from Children in Crossfire with Sainsbury's staff member Ciara McDevitt who are working together to promote awareness of Fair Trade products in Derry. (1103PG61)
From left, Marcy Mueller, Mark McMahon and Kelly Krinn from Children in Crossfire with Sainsbury's staff member Ciara McDevitt who are working together to promote awareness of Fair Trade products in Derry. (1103PG61)
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Derry is going bananas for Fairtrade and local charity Children in Crossfire in right behind the scheme.

To help mark Fairtrade fortnight the charity has teamed up with Sainsbury’s on the Strand Road to highlight the wide variety of Fairtrade produce available to local shoppers.

Shoppers were treated to a wide array of produce to try, including chocolate, teas, coffees and bananas, the pricing of which in supermarkets is often highly controversial.

“We are part of a steering group to try and help make Derry a Fairtrade city,” said JR McLaughlin, of Children in Crossfire: “We are trying to highlight the number of products which are currently available and Sainsbury’s is the largest provider of Fairtrade goods in the city.”

Fairtrade is a trading partnership which aims to make sure food producers receive a fair price for their produce.

Anything sold with the Fairtrade mark is a guarantee that agreements are in place to pay at least minimum prices to the producer to cover the costs of sustainable production.

“We have been involved with this with Derry city Council for about two years now,” added Mr. McLaughlin.

“We approached Sainsbury’s because we knew they were the largest supplier.

“One of the things we needed to engage with was retailers on a commercial basis so we could get their co-operation.”

Foyle MP Mark Durkan is also teaming up with five-time Olympic gold medalist Sir Steve Redgrave in an attempt to break the world record for the longest bunting to raise awareness for Fairtrade.

“It is scandalous that West African farmers who earn less than $1 a day cannot use their farming skills to trade their way out of poverty,” Mr Durkan said.

“From the amount of Fairtrade goods now available in local shops, I know trade justice is something people in Derry and throughout the North really care about.