ReUse centre opens in Derry

Environment Minister Mark H Durkan and Social Development Minister Nelson McCausland and The Mayor, Councillor Martin Reilly, pictured in the workshop of a new Derry City Council Project ReUse Project at Pennyburn Industrial estate which recycles discarded white goods, furniture, toys and garden equipment. The social enterprise project in association with the Resource Centre provides training opportunities for as many as twenty young people. Included are Kenny McAdams, Resource Centre and Emmet McLaughlin, Electrical Tutor. Picture Martin McKeown. Inpresspics.com. 20.08.13

Environment Minister Mark H Durkan and Social Development Minister Nelson McCausland and The Mayor, Councillor Martin Reilly, pictured in the workshop of a new Derry City Council Project ReUse Project at Pennyburn Industrial estate which recycles discarded white goods, furniture, toys and garden equipment. The social enterprise project in association with the Resource Centre provides training opportunities for as many as twenty young people. Included are Kenny McAdams, Resource Centre and Emmet McLaughlin, Electrical Tutor. Picture Martin McKeown. Inpresspics.com. 20.08.13

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A £0.5million reuse centre has opened in the Pennyburn area of Derry.

The Derry City Council project, jointly funded by Departments of the Environment and Social Development will provide training opportunities for as many as 20 young people in joinery, furniture repair and sales as well as creating some full time employment.

Discarded white goods, furniture, bikes, toys and garden equipment will now be repaired to provide quality goods to be offered for resale or distributed to those in need, benefiting the environment and benefiting the local community.

Environment Minister Mark H Durkan said the centre will “deliver three major benefits to Derry, improving the environment, improving the local economy and improving the employment opportunities for young people.

“This facility will keep items out of landfill, assisting Derry’s drive to be a sustainable city. The resultant diversion of 500 tonnes of waste per year from landfill will help recycling and climate change targets.

“The ReUse centre will provide quality, good value products for the community and will keep money in the local economy.

“The estimated £50,000 per year in landfill cost savings can now be invested in more worthwhile activities by the council rather than being buried in the ground. The refurbishment of items provides novel opportunities and skills to help our young people find jobs. What I and DOE are about is a better environment and a stronger economy and this will help towards that goal,” he said.