Clegg, Kenny in city for political summit

<p>''Magee is a campus of the University of Ulster located in Derry, Northern Ireland. It opened in 1865 as a Presbyterian Christian arts and theological college. Today, it has no religious affiliation and provides a broad range of undergraduate and postgraduate academic degree programmes in a wide range of disciplines ranging from computer science, computer games and robotics to psychology and nursing. &quot;Magee&quot; gained its name from Martha Magee, the widow of a Presbyterian minister, who, in 1845, bequeathed &pound;20,000 to the Presbyterian Church of Ireland to found a college for theology and the arts.</p>

<p>''Magee is a campus of the University of Ulster located in Derry, Northern Ireland. It opened in 1865 as a Presbyterian Christian arts and theological college. Today, it has no religious affiliation and provides a broad range of undergraduate and postgraduate academic degree programmes in a wide range of disciplines ranging from computer science, computer games and robotics to psychology and nursing. &quot;Magee&quot; gained its name from Martha Magee, the widow of a Presbyterian minister, who, in 1845, bequeathed &pound;20,000 to the Presbyterian Church of Ireland to found a college for theology and the arts.</p>

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British deputy prime minister Nick Clegg and Taoiseach Enda Kenny are in Derry today for a summit meeting of the British-Irish Council (BIC).

Joining them at Magee College for the 20th get-together of the high-level government body are leaders and ministers from the eight BIC Member Administrations: the British and Irish Governments, the devolved administrations of the Scottish and Welsh Governments and Northern Ireland Executive, the Isle of Man Government and the Governments of Jersey and Guernsey.

The meeting will focus on the economy, including the impact of energy costs, the City of Culture experience, and proposals for a new BIC Creative Industries work sector.

The summit, which is being chaired by First Minister Peter Robinson and Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness, is only the second time a British-Irish Council (BIC) summit has been held in the North, and the first since that Belfast meeting in July 2007.

A noticeable security presence was evident in and around the Magee campus throughout the day.

It’s understood a delegation from the summit is also due to visit a local primary school where they will meet the principal, teachers and pupils.

The British-Irish Council was created as part of the Good Friday Agreement discussions in 1998.