Crisis Intervention Centre for Derry plan

Group pictured during the vigil held at Galliagh roundabout back in 2014 to remember those who died by suicide and to call for better intervention services locally. DER3714-103KM
Group pictured during the vigil held at Galliagh roundabout back in 2014 to remember those who died by suicide and to call for better intervention services locally. DER3714-103KM

Derry & Strabane Council have said that efforts to draw together a business case for a crisis intervention centre in the city to help tackle suicide and self-harm are progressing.

The move follows a massive campaign for better services for people in crisis in Derry following a string of tragedies over recent years.

Some of those who joined in a 'Chain Along The Foyle' at a previous rally. DER1815MC159

Some of those who joined in a 'Chain Along The Foyle' at a previous rally. DER1815MC159

The current situation was outlined in papers brought before the Council’s Health & Community Committee at its April meeting sitting in Strabane on Thursday.

A paper was presented at the meeting following on from the same committee deciding back in December 2015 that a business case be formulated for a Crisis Intervention Centre to be set up within the Derry & Strabane area.

The report states that a study visit for party leaders within the council was organised to the Nightingale Crisis Support Centre, Belfast on January 25. During the visit, local elected representatives discussed the approach taken by this service and viewed the facilities in Belfast.

The report brought before the committee yesterday states: “The multi-agency working group will continue to collaborate to share best practice, map current services and develop the scope of service which may be required as part of a Crisis Intervention Service.

“A detailed research process is ongoing to fully inform the business case, drawing from existing research, models of practice delivered elsewhere and the societal costs of self-harm and suicide.”

An outline review of a number of Crisis Intervention Services, including those services in Britain, the Republic of Ireland and elsewhere, is ongoing, the committee has been informed.

Many of those identified are described as being similar to the Nightingale model, while others have medical staff embedded within them.