Derry groups share £133k funding boost

Pictured at the International Fund for Ireland Board Meeting in County Leitrim are Board Members: Dorothy Clarke, David Graham, Rose Mary Farrell, Dr Adrian Johnston (Chairman of the Fund), Winston Patterson and Siobhan Fitzpatrick.
Pictured at the International Fund for Ireland Board Meeting in County Leitrim are Board Members: Dorothy Clarke, David Graham, Rose Mary Farrell, Dr Adrian Johnston (Chairman of the Fund), Winston Patterson and Siobhan Fitzpatrick.

Three Derry groups have benefited from just under £150,000 in funding boosts from the International Fund for Ireland, it’s been announced.

Creggan Enterprises, St Columb’s Park House and the James Connolly Cultural Youth Group are the three local groups to have secured money.

Creggan enterprises were given £63,750 to extend the two-year Unheard Voices Women’s Project for an additional nine months. The project has been very successful in reaching out to women from difficult constituencies in Derry giving voice to their experiences and engaging many in ground-breaking cross-community activity for the first time.

St Columb’s Park House was given £39,021 to extend the two-year project undertaken through the Londonderry Bands Forum. The extension will enable the project to increase the number of schools accessing its Education Programme, enhance the number of bands and participants involved in Capacity Building Programmes and Cultural workshops, and review the Maiden City Accord and promote its use beyond the Derry area.

The third group to benefit from the funding is the James Connolly Cultural Youth Group who received

£31,050 to deliver a new ten month peace building and cultural project that engages with young people in Derry who are supportive of, but feel excluded from, the Peace Process as they are not part of the established groups involved.

Commenting on the announcement, Dr Adrian Johnston, Chairman of the International Fund for

Ireland, said: “Over the last two years, we have focused considerable effort on reconnecting with marginalised individuals and groups who remain excluded from government and other interventions. The Peace

Impact Programme has been a core part of that strategy, enabling 53 community projects to deliver impressive results and positive change in areas requiring intervention. As a result, the potential for violence has been reduced and many participants are finding employment and positive leadership roles in their community.

“We have taken risks in the cause of peace and reached out to vulnerable young people in areas where the political settlement is strongly, often violently, opposed. The quality of our interventions has never been more evident and the need to engage with those who have had limited participation in peace building and community reconciliation activities has never been greater.”