DCSIMG

Duffy raises awareness of diabetes

Sinn F�in Councillors Sandra Duffy, Eric McGinley and Paul Fleming taking part in the Risk Assessment roadshow at Waterloo Place in Derry.

Sinn F�in Councillors Sandra Duffy, Eric McGinley and Paul Fleming taking part in the Risk Assessment roadshow at Waterloo Place in Derry.

 

Sinn Féin Councillors Sandra Duffy, Eric McGinley and Paul Fleming taking part in the Risk Assessment roadshow at Waterloo Place in Derry.

Colr. Duffy attended her own risk assessment along with fellow Sinn Fein councillors, Paul Fleming and Eric McGinley recently.

“We [Sinn Fein] felt it was very important to go along and take part in the risk assessment roadshow,” she said.

“There needs to be a focus on helping to try and raise awareness of this illness and alert patients to the early warning signs and to also increase knowledge and awareness about diabetes and its treatment. Initiatives like this are very important,” she added.

Colr. Duffy, went on to recommend that people affected by diabetes avail of the different support groups and charities out there. Colr. Duffy said these organisations can make a considerable difference to anyone struggling after they have been diagnosed with diabetes.

“For many adjusting to the news that they or a member of your family has diabetes takes time and it is often helpful to meet other people who have been through a similar situation. They can offer understanding, help and support at an important time”

Diabetes is a lifelong condition caused by a lack, or insufficiency of insulin. Insulin is a hormone - a substance of vital importance that is made by your pancreas. Insulin acts like a key to open the doors into your cells, letting sugar (glucose) in. In diabetes, the pancreas makes too little insulin to enable all the sugar in your blood to get into your muscle and other cells to produce energy. If sugar can’t get into the cells to be used, it builds up in the bloodstream. Therefore, diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels. Excess sugar is also excreted in the urine, hence the practice, in days gone by, of tasting it to diagnose the condition.

 

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