Top UNICEF award for Holy Child PS

Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness pictured with Mrs. Aine O'Connor, teacher, Paul Clarke, UNICEF Ambassador, Miss Orla McDonnell,  principal, and pupils from Holy Child Primary School, Derry, who have received the UNICEF Level 2 Rights Respecting School Award.

Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness pictured with Mrs. Aine O'Connor, teacher, Paul Clarke, UNICEF Ambassador, Miss Orla McDonnell, principal, and pupils from Holy Child Primary School, Derry, who have received the UNICEF Level 2 Rights Respecting School Award.

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Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness has presented Derry’s Holy Child Primary School with a prestigious UNICEF Award.

The Creggan school joins a select group of 13 primary schools across the North to receive the Level 2 Rights Respecting School Award.

The award recognises achievement in putting the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) at the heart of a school’s planning, policies, practice and ethos.

Mr. McGuinness said the award was a fantastic achievement for the Derry school.

“You don’t achieve awards of this nature without considerable hard work and effort by teachers and pupils alike,” he said.

“I congratulate Miss Orla McDonnell, school principal, and everyone within the Holy Child community for participating in such a worthwhile programme.

“Holy Child Primary School plays an important role in the Creggan area and the skills and lessons the pupils have gained through this programme will extend beyond the school gate. This award will help teach the pupils the importance of respect and reminds our young people they are the future.

“The pupils of Holy Child are a great source of hope and confidence for the future and I wish the school and all the pupils continued success.”

Orla McDonnell said the school was “extremely proud” of its achievement: “The Rights Respecting Ethos is now part and parcel of who we are and how we live each day in our school... The children, staff and, more importantly, their families and the wider community in Creggan, have all contributed to this new culture.”