Inishowen bids farewell to Danny McDaid

The remains of the late fisherman Danny McDaid are carried into St. Patrick's Church, Aughaclay on Wednesday morning for Requiem Mass. DER2714MC035
The remains of the late fisherman Danny McDaid are carried into St. Patrick's Church, Aughaclay on Wednesday morning for Requiem Mass. DER2714MC035

Mourners at the funeral of a tragic Glengad fisherman heard there was a sense of “loss and bewilderment that someone so young, so alive, could be taken so quickly.”

Hundreds of Danny McDaid’s family, friends and neighbours packed into St Patrick’s Church in Aughaclay for the his Requiem Mass.

The number of mourners was so vast that many more stood outside the Malin Church, joined in grief with his wife Marjorie, daughters Danielle and Amanda, grandchildren, siblings and extended family.

There were emotional scenes as Mr McDaid’s little granddaughters led his remains into the Church.

Poignantly, his coffin was adorned with children’s drawings and tributes, with words like ‘I love you’ and ‘I will miss you’ written by tiny hands.

Mr McDaid, one of the founders of Men’s Shed, Carn, died on Saturday last off the coast of Kinnego Bay.

Those who helped “bring him home” were acknowledged during the Prayers of the Faithful.

Parish Priest Fr Peter Devlin said Mr McDaid’s loss was “tragic and sudden.”

He said a death, when tragic, “brings home to all of us the fragile nature of our existence.”

He referred to the scriptures, when Jesus died and the Apostles felt “grief stricken and abandoned.”

Fr Devlin said while we “wish we could wake up from this bad dream and all would be well, the human Danny is gone.”

He added while this was the case, memories of him live on.

“His liveliness,his kindness, his good nature, his humour, his skills, his commitment to family, all of those are memories we cherish and give us the basis for hope and ultimately optimism,” he said.

Mourners also heard a reflection from Mr McDaid’s relative, Tracey, who drew laughter from the congregation when she told her uncle it “would be like you to cause a fuss.”

She asked what she’d do about her car, recalling how Mr McDaid “came down to our house and ate us for not having oil in our cars.”

She told how he taught her to weld and said she’s look after the “stuff” in his shed.

She concluded: “As much as you were a dose, we love you really and will all miss you.”

Following Requiem Mass, Mr McDaid was buried in the Sacred Heart cemetery, Carndonagh.