Legacy of past needs ‘integrity’ and ‘honesty’

Mickey English pictured in his home in Cable Street last Friday. On the wall, behind Mickey, are pictures of his sons Gary and Charles, who were both killed in Derry during the 1980s. The 30th anniversary of Charles' death is on Thursday August 6 and will be marked with a commemoration at the Lecky Road republican monument at 7pm. The other photo on the wall is of Mickey and his grandson Oscar on the last official Bloody Sunday Commemoration March in January 2011.

Mickey English pictured in his home in Cable Street last Friday. On the wall, behind Mickey, are pictures of his sons Gary and Charles, who were both killed in Derry during the 1980s. The 30th anniversary of Charles' death is on Thursday August 6 and will be marked with a commemoration at the Lecky Road republican monument at 7pm. The other photo on the wall is of Mickey and his grandson Oscar on the last official Bloody Sunday Commemoration March in January 2011.

The father of a man killed in Derry in 1981 believes all that is required to properly investigate deaths caused by the security forces during the Troubles is “integrity and honesty”.

Mickey English lost sons Gary and Charlie in separate incidents in Derry in 1981 and 1985 respectively.

Mr. English has already received a report from the now defunct Historical Enquiries Team (HET) on the death of Charlie but Gary’s death has yet to be investigated.

PSNI Chief Constable, George Hamilton controversially called for a debate on how best to deal with the legacy of the past last week.

Mr. English said as far as he was concerned no debate is needed.

“When it comes to the issue of the past there are many lone voices like mine that are not being heard,” said Mr. English.

“My starting point when it comes to the past is that people who were responsible for incidents when people lost their lives or were injured did not take the responsibility to investigate, and in some cases, when security forces were involved, it wasn’t even perceived, at the time, as a crime, hence there was no investigation.”

Mr. English added: “While George Hamilton might claim that the issue of the past has become a burden in terms of manpower and cost, I don’t think it takes a lot of manpower and cost to get to the truth - all it really takes is integrity, honesty and for those in charge to ask the right questions - none of these three components impinge upon resources.”