DCSIMG

Nazareth nuns apologise for homes’ abuse

Historical Institutional Abuse Inquiry panel members, from left, David Lane, Chairman Sir Anthony Hart and Geraldine Doherty.

Historical Institutional Abuse Inquiry panel members, from left, David Lane, Chairman Sir Anthony Hart and Geraldine Doherty.

The inquiry into historical abuse has heard an apology from the Sisters of Nazareth for the abuse and hurt suffered by children in their care homes.

The religious order of nuns - which ran a number of children’s homes in Derry - said it “apologised unreservedly” for any abuse suffered by children in their care.

Two Derry homes run by the Sisters are among a number of church and state institutions which are now at the centre of the UK’s largest ever investigation into alleged abuse over seven decades.

A barrister representing the Sisters of Nazareth said they “recognise the hurt that’s been caused to some children in their care”.

“They apologise unreservedly for any abuse suffered by children in their care,” he added. “They go forward hoping that lessons will be learned, not just by them in the provision of care, but also by carers generally in society and in wider society at large.”

The Nazareth nuns operated St Joseph’s Boys’ Home, Termonbacca, and Nazareth House Children’s Home at Bishop Street, in Derry.

Today is the second day of the abuse inquiry, which is being chaired by retired judge Sir Anthony Hart, and is set to hear the testimony of more than 300 victims.

Earlier, a senior lawyer to the investigation panel told the hearing that some children’s homes in Northern Ireland were outdated “survivors of a bygone age” by the 1960s.

The inquiry, which is expected to last 18 months, is examining abuse claims in Northern Ireland children’s homes and juvenile justice between 1922 and 1995.

 
 
 

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