Are the “floors” of London still paved with gold?

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England is a strange country. Just for once and completely out-of-character, I’ve decided to avoid being needlessly contentious here by using the word ‘strange’ instead of ‘foreign,’ but please feel entirely free to please yourself on that point!

England is a strange country. Just for once and completely out-of-character, I’ve decided to avoid being needlessly contentious here by using the word ‘strange’ instead of ‘foreign,’ but please feel entirely free to please yourself on that point!

It’s strange because, over there, rugby pitches and streets have “floors”.

There we were in our innocence thinking that you only had “floors” inside buildings.

So OK, maybe the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff does have a “floor” because it has a roof.

None of the rugby grounds in England have roofs yet they also have “floors” according to TV commentators.

They seem to be covered in grass but they’re still, “floors”. Rugby players are for ever “hitting the floor” and getting the ball down on the “floor”. Ah, maybe it’s not that strange, as even the country’s town and cities have “floors”.

Last week the BBC had a TV report about cleaning gum off the “floors” in some English cities.

This I must see, I thought to myself. How do they differ from our streets, roads and pavements?

Nothing obvious I could see but then I remembered reading in childhood that the “floors” in London are paved with gold!

But I don’t want to be too sore on the English. In fairness, a letter in ‘The Daily Telegraph’ from a man in Sussex, complained that: “Grandkids’ is a horrid word.” “‘Uni’ is worse. ‘Grandkids at uni’ is not only a ghastly phrase but expensive, too,” he wrote. I agree.