Flying the flag for Scotland

0
Have your say

Have you been to Portstewart recently? If so, you probably noticed, on your way into the town, an extraordinary number of Scottish Saltires. They’re attached to lamp posts in roughly equal numbers with the more usual, so-called Ulster Flags and strange colours of more obscure significance. Fortunately the proliferation of flags ends before you get to the Promenade. It’s a pleasantly flag free area.

Have you been to Portstewart recently? If so, you probably noticed, on your way into the town, an extraordinary number of Scottish Saltires. They’re attached to lamp posts in roughly equal numbers with the more usual, so-called Ulster Flags and strange colours of more obscure significance. Fortunately the proliferation of flags ends before you get to the Promenade. It’s a pleasantly flag free area.

Here in Derry you may come across an occasional Saltire. I noticed one in Drumahoe but they’re few and far between compared with the display in Portstewart.

Scottish people are unlikely to be delighted that their national flag features in our bizarre flag displays.

In normal countries flags of other nations are usually flown, particularly in summer, to welcome visitors. There’s virtually no chance of Scottish visitors thinking that’s why their flags are flying here. The black tape and cable ties at differing heights on the lamp posts are a give-away. It’s also hard to imagine many Scottish people being pleased to know their national flag is embroiled in our sad territory marking exercises.

Had Scottish people voted for independence in their close-run referendum, their Saint Andrew’s Cross may have lost popularity here. It’s a shame they didn’t go for it. Then in nearby Bushmills tourists en route to the UNESCO World Heritage Site at the Giant’s Causeway are treated to another remarkable jumble of flags. There a few American Confederate flags join the line-up. That’s even stranger.