Reporting from the hilarious snow lane

CRESCENT LINK ROAD. . . .Blizzard-like conditions made driving treacherous yesterday afternoon as traffic was almost brought to a halt at Crescent Link with cars being unable to make it up the hill. INLS0215MC011
CRESCENT LINK ROAD. . . .Blizzard-like conditions made driving treacherous yesterday afternoon as traffic was almost brought to a halt at Crescent Link with cars being unable to make it up the hill. INLS0215MC011

It’s a different world up there,” a radio reporter in Belfast said with a giggle last Wednesday. She was acknowledging that Derry had snow and Belfast didn’t.

It’s a different world up there,” a radio reporter in Belfast said with a giggle last Wednesday. She was acknowledging that Derry had snow and Belfast didn’t.

Hmmm! The saying, “Many a true word was spoken in jest” came to mind. Of course it was only a throw-away line, not to be taken seriously but it was symptomatic of the tone of reporting. Even the weather forecaster said, “Over here” to refer to the Belfast area. It reinforced the notion that the BBC is Belfast centric. After all they even give us tide times for Belfast. Tide times vary enormously. It would be difficult to work out Derry tides from Belfast tides. Do tide times matter more to Belfast people?

The previous week there were particularly severe gales in the North West and along the north coast but they barely rated a mention.

Ah! I hear you say – we have BBC Foyle to redress the balance. That’s fair enough but on Radio Foyle the snow story was all such a giggle: such a cause for lame hilarity that I began to suffer a sense-of-humour-failure about that too. Presenters should cop on that while you’re sitting in your nice warm work a little humour is OK but too much inane giggling is irritating while others struggle on grid-locked roads or treacherous pavements.

Yes I’m well into the grumpy territory but I recognise the sense-of-humour failure is setting in when even mispronunciations and bad grammar irritate. I’m thinking of “Jay sus” for the French “Je suis” or “I seen” [sic] such-and-such-a thing this morning, followed by an exclamation some would find offensive. Isn’t that unprofessional?