Strange world out in cyberspace

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Is there something about social media that encourages us to lose the run of ourselves? Or is it that Facebook, Twitter and so on just make irrational behaviour more widely known about by a wider audience? We’ve all heard of ‘internet trolls’ who dole out abusive, ignorant and inappropriate comments to the most inoffensive of individuals. To rephrase the questions: Does internet trolling exist because it’s easier to type abuse on a keyboard than it is to shout at someone? Or, does social media just allow more people to be aware of bad behaviour?

Is there something about social media that encourages us to lose the run of ourselves? Or is it that Facebook, Twitter and so on just make irrational behaviour more widely known about by a wider audience? We’ve all heard of ‘internet trolls’ who dole out abusive, ignorant and inappropriate comments to the most inoffensive of individuals. To rephrase the questions: Does internet trolling exist because it’s easier to type abuse on a keyboard than it is to shout at someone? Or, does social media just allow more people to be aware of bad behaviour?

Social media also provides a medium for well-intentioned or seemingly kind comment which is, in reality, just as irrational as trolling. Social networking can create all sorts of strange parallel universes.

People with virtually any common bond, or not so common bond, can get together on the internet. Of course, that wasn’t possible before the technological revolution.

So it is that those with say, similar pets can group together. Strange sub-cultures develop even with their own peculiar ‘lingos’.

People write, for instance, about their “fur babies.” They’re dogs that don’t go to the vet when they’re sick; they go to the “dogtor” who remains “pawsitive”.

On this side of the pond people have their knees worn out praying for sick dogs in America and have collected enormous sums of money for them to have operations.

Yes, there are very strange worlds out there in cyberspace.