Sunday probe cuts branded ‘political’

The brother of a Derry man killed on Bloody Sunday has questioned the worth of British Prime Minister David Cameron’s apology for the bloodshed given police comments regarding the murder investigation.

Mickey McKinney, whose brother William was one of the 14 people murdered on Bloody Sunday, raised the matter while speaking to the Journal during a city centre protest yesterday.

BLOODY SUNDAY FAMILIES PROTEST'Derry no2-4/10/2014-TREVOR MCBRIDE PICTURE�?'Blood Sunday relatives protesting at the gathering in Guildhall Square over the decision to reduce or delay police investigation due to budget cuts-SAT

BLOODY SUNDAY FAMILIES PROTEST'Derry no2-4/10/2014-TREVOR MCBRIDE PICTURE�?'Blood Sunday relatives protesting at the gathering in Guildhall Square over the decision to reduce or delay police investigation due to budget cuts-SAT

Mr McKinney joined dozens of other relatives of those killed, some of the surviving wounded and others involved in the campaign for justice outside the Guildhall .

They were protesting after the PSNI spokesperson confirmed that the murder inquiry would be “reduced or delayed” because of budget cuts.

Mr McKinney said: “We were already of the view that the investigation was going to be lengthy and going to take three to four years. That concerned us but I wonder now at this stage because of the money problem, have they seen a way of protecting their own by winding this down?

“I have a thought now standing here, it takes me back to the 15th of June three years ago, about David Cameron’s apology. I don’t think it means too much at all given what has happened over the last few days.”

BLOODY SUNDAY FAMILUES PROTEST'Derry no3-4/10/2014-TREVOR MCBRIDE PICTURE�'Blood Sunday relatives protesting at the gathering in Guildhall Square over the decision to reduce or delay police investigation due to budget cuts-SAT

BLOODY SUNDAY FAMILUES PROTEST'Derry no3-4/10/2014-TREVOR MCBRIDE PICTURE�'Blood Sunday relatives protesting at the gathering in Guildhall Square over the decision to reduce or delay police investigation due to budget cuts-SAT

Damien ‘Bubbles’ Donaghy- the first person to be wounded on Bloody Sunday- questioned whether political parties here knew that this was coming down the line via the Policing Board. He said that the Bloody Sunday and other victims were all being treated with “disrespect”.

Kate Nash, who lost her brother William and whose father Alex was shot and wounded on Bloody Sunday, said:

“If the British government think that we are just going to go away then they really need to think again. That struggle for justice continues because these people that were massacred here in Derry were innocent, and the British government have already apologised for that, taken full responsibility, so it is now their responsibility to apply the law and stop hiding.”

In a statement from the Bloody Sunday March Committee, issued at the protest, a spokesman said: “The new investigation was supposed to be a stand-alone. But now it’s to take by far the biggest hit in the cut-backs in policing. This is a political decision, not a cost-cutting measure.

“If the powers that be were truly sorry for Bloody Sunday there would be no question of cutting the investigation back. What hope is there of truth and justice now for the families of those shot down by the paras in Ballymurphy, or for the families of the two men murdered by the paras on the Shankill Road eight months after Bloody Sunday?”

In a separate development on Friday, Peter Madden of Madden & Finucane Solicitors, who act for the majority of the families and wounded, said the PSNi had a legal obligation to investigate murder

“In the absence of a reconsideration by the PSNI and a firm commitment to properly resource this murder investigation we will be left with no alternative but to challenge that decision in the High Court in Belfast,” he said.