The landscape of ‘Gelvin’

An early 1950's photograph of Herd's House, near the base of the Benbradagh Mountain, inhabited then by James and Teresa Heaveron. (0706SJ60)
An early 1950's photograph of Herd's House, near the base of the Benbradagh Mountain, inhabited then by James and Teresa Heaveron. (0706SJ60)

There is no clearly defined area known as ‘Gelvin’, rather it is many townlands which make up the rural Gelvin area, just north of Dungiven.

But a new exhibition at the Green Lane Museum at the Roe Valley Country Park in Limavady shows the area’s vast landscape through a variety of images.

Produced by the Gelvin Community Association, the exhibition also reflects the archaeological history of the area and the changes through the years.

“Within this rural Gelvin area much evidence of the past is provided, from the many abandoned dwellings, archaeological sites, forgotten burial grounds, lazy beds, and overgrown turf banks,” said a spokesperson.

Evidence of close links with the past are ever present in the landscape such as in the townland of Derryork with its abandoned dwelling, Herd’s House and the road bridges over the old Limavady/Dungiven railway line.

The exhibition also gives an idea about farming and industry on the past, such as flax milling.

“In Drumgavenny Lower, there is also this close link to a time not so long ago with its remnants of a once thriving flax milling industry, where local farmers delivered their dried flax to the mill for scutching,” said the spokesperson, adding:

“This exhibition gives the chance to view images and gain information of this historical landscape which otherwise may go unnoticed.”

Located within Roe Valley Country Park, Green Lane Museum gives visitors the opportunity to see historical exhibits relating to local trades, agriculture and linen production and to experience a variety of temporary exhibitions and draft demonstrations throughout the summer months.

To find out more about Gelvin, its people and townlands, check out http://gelvinca.ning.com/