38,519: number of people killed on roads North and south since records began

Police at the Scene of an accident on the N78 near Athy, Co Kildare, where four young women were killed after the car they were in collided with a van earlier this year.  Photo: Niall Carson/PA Wire
Police at the Scene of an accident on the N78 near Athy, Co Kildare, where four young women were killed after the car they were in collided with a van earlier this year. Photo: Niall Carson/PA Wire
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Almost 40,000 people have been killed on the roads in the North and South of Ireland since records began, according to the Department for the Environment (DOE).

All those who have died in road traffic collisions will be remembered on the World Day of Remembrance on Sunday November 15.

Environment Minister, Mark H Durkan, and Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Paschal Donohoe TD, along with the Road Safety Authority (RSA), An Garda Síochána, the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI), Fire & Rescue Services, Local Authorities and road safety groups, are calling on road-users to join the international community in remembering all those who have lost their lives in road traffic collisions.

A total of 14,767 people have been killed on roads in the North since deaths were first recorded in 1931. A total of 23,752 people have been killed on roads in the South since records began in 1959.

Environment Minister, Mark H Durkan said: “Many generations and thousands of families in the North, including my own, have been devastated by the grief of loss and the heartache of road tragedy. Almost 15,000 people, just like you and me, have lost their lives.

“And this is why I am working along with my road safety partners - the PSNI, the NI Fire and Rescue Service and the NI Ambulance Service amongst others - towards reducing the carnage on our roads. We must do everything possible to prevent this loss and suffering touching any more lives.

“Road safety is a continuous challenge and road deaths do not discriminate. All road users are vulnerable, every journey, every day, every road. The certainty of the unexpected means that it is crucial to reduce speed, wear seatbelts and eliminate high risk behaviours.”

Mr. Durkand added: “I am fully committed to improving safety for all road users. I firmly believe that by working together, we can rise to the challenge of making our roads safer for everyone.”

Minister Durkan concluded: “I therefore encourage that all road users commit to be the best road user they can be by pledging at Share the Road to Zero.”