‘Troubles’ artefacts tour to start in Derry

SCREAMING BINLIDS... Just one of the many binlids that were banged in protest and as a means of communication in some nationalist areas during the Troubles. the binlid is just one of the items that will be displayed in HealingThrough Remembering's exhibition, 'Everyday Objects Transformed by the Conflict.' Pictured are Buncrana woman Triona White Hamilton, exhibition co-ordinator, Alan McBride, on left, HTR board member and Oliver Wilkinson, HTR hon secretary.

SCREAMING BINLIDS... Just one of the many binlids that were banged in protest and as a means of communication in some nationalist areas during the Troubles. the binlid is just one of the items that will be displayed in HealingThrough Remembering's exhibition, 'Everyday Objects Transformed by the Conflict.' Pictured are Buncrana woman Triona White Hamilton, exhibition co-ordinator, Alan McBride, on left, HTR board member and Oliver Wilkinson, HTR hon secretary.

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An exhibition of everyday items in use during the ‘Troubles’ will go on display at First Derry Presbyterian Church on March 5.

The exhibition has been organised by Healing Through Remembering (HTR) - the cross-community organisation that focuses on ways of dealing with the conflict, with the aim of achieving a peaceful future for all.

The project is called “Everyday Objects Transformed by the Conflict” and will be open to the public at the Magazine Street church between March 6-28 (Monday-Friday, 10am-4pm).

Derry exhibitors include the the Museum of Free Derry, Maiden City Festival, the Tower Museum and private collector Frankie McMenamin.

Items on show at the exhibit - which is curated by Buncrana woman Triona White Hamilton - will include:

* A CS gas canister turned into a working lamp. The canister was fired by the RUC during the Battle of the Bogside in 1969.

* A binlid – used as a communication tool and a means of protest in nationalist areas.

* An armoured clipboard carried by police at vehicle checkpoints in ‘high-risk’ areas. It was to give protection to officers if threatened with a handgun.

* A ‘sponger’ badge worn by loyalists in protest at strike leaders being called “spongers” by the then Prime Minster, Harold Wilson.

Entrance to the exhibition and workshop participation are free.

People who would like more information about the project, or who would like to book a workshop, should contact: Triona White Hamilton, exhibition curator/co-ordinator, at Healing Through Remembering on Tel: 028 9023 8844 or via email at exhibition@healingthroughremembering.org