Nice bridge but what about the poor?

Pacemaker Press 1/3/11 Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness  during  the launch of the Hunger Strike 30th Anniversary Exhibition in the Linen Hall Library, Belfast yesterday Pic Colm Lenaghan/Pacemaker
Pacemaker Press 1/3/11 Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness during the launch of the Hunger Strike 30th Anniversary Exhibition in the Linen Hall Library, Belfast yesterday Pic Colm Lenaghan/Pacemaker
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I would have thought that in a city that has unquestionably one of the poorest populations on average in the UK we would have by now made some kind of progress in minimizing the Tory cuts and their effects on our people.

Martin McGuinness boastfully announced a few weeks back that “Derry’s looking great” on BBC programme The View brought from Derry.

He strangely looked proudly from the Debenhams café studio in Foyleside and was pleased with what he saw – a lit up Peace Bridge.

No-one doubts that the Peace Bridge and its environs have remarkably changed the city centre for the better. Its current centrality is a remarkable testament to the innate happiness of Derry people.

But that improvement hasn’t extended to improving the lot of the poorest sections of Derry’s society, who are increasingly struggling to make ends meet. My fear is that this is happening in Derry because politicians in all parties are reluctant to offend the narrative of their millionaire donors. That narrative may suggest that “the scroungers” are getting too much.

I’m sure most Derry people will wonder how these people can have so much material wealth while people are starving across this planet.

John O’Connell

Derry