Second World Gold for Smyth in Lyon

22 June 2013; Jason Smyth, Ireland, crosses the line in the Men's 100m heats, during the European Athletics Team Championships 1st League. Morton Stadium, Santry, Co. Dublin. Picture credit: Brendan Moran / SPORTSFILE

22 June 2013; Jason Smyth, Ireland, crosses the line in the Men's 100m heats, during the European Athletics Team Championships 1st League. Morton Stadium, Santry, Co. Dublin. Picture credit: Brendan Moran / SPORTSFILE

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Eglinton sprinter, Jason Smyth produced yet another scintillating display in the 100m final in Lyon as he powered his way to his second gold of the IPC World Championships yesterday evening.

The 25 year-old partially sighted athlete added the T13 100m crown to his 200m gold secured last Saturday after setting a new Championship record of 10.6secs.

It was a dominant display from the City of Derry Spartan, ensuring he repeated his double gold winning heroics achieved at the IPC World Championships in Christchurch, New Zealand in 2001.

Smyth was fastest by some distance in yesterday’s semi-finals and was never troubled in the final with his nearest challenger, South African Jonathan Atutu second in 11.12secs. Bulgarian, Radoslav Zlatanov took bronze in 11.15.

Smyth emulated the feat of his room-mate Michael McKillop by completing his own Double Double.

The sprinter who has competed at the European Championships for able-bodied athletes, was delighted to have made up for missing out on the 2011 IPC World Athletics Championships in Christchurch due to injury.

“It’s fantastic to be here and finished. I’ve crossed the line twice and won both gold medals. Not making New Zealand just makes it a little more sweeter this year so I’m just delighted all the work I’ve put in has paid off.

“It’s fantastic (for Michael and I) to have each other in very similar situations as we go into most major championships. It’s good to have somebody to bounce things off and just enjoy it.

“It’s extremely tough when you’ve under 10% vision. Everything is blurry but it’s the only way I can ever remember it so to me it’s normal. But if you imagine taking away 90% of your vision, you’ll struggle with everything. It’s just a case of getting on with it and trying to make the most of the situation,” he said.