A walk along the quay would be better

Liam Neeson in 'A Walk Among The Tombstones'.
Liam Neeson in 'A Walk Among The Tombstones'.
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Liam Neeson’s new movie boasts one of the best film titles of the year so far.

Unfortunately, the title, is the best thing about ‘A Walk Among The Tombstones’.

Dan Stevens in 'A Walk Among The Tombstones'.

Dan Stevens in 'A Walk Among The Tombstones'.

It’s so utterly boring at times that I found it virtually impossible to experience any sort of emotion.

Instead of feeling like a bona fide hardboiled thriller ‘A Walk Among The Tombstones’ is just too soft in the middle.

Neeson plays Matt Scudder, a former police detective who has more baggage than a luggage carousel after a flight from Tenerife to City of Derry Airport.

After a tragic incident in 1991, Scudder retires from the police force and proceeds to eek out and existence as a private detective.

Kenny Kristo’s (Dan Stevens) wife is abducted and despite paying the ransom, she is murdered.

Kristo pays Scudder to find the men responsible and bring them to him.

Scudder starts to investigate the disappearance of the woman and as he scratches below the surface he uncovers something very disturbing.

Almost every film that Neeson has starred in since uttering those unforgettable lines in 2008 is automatically compared to ‘Taken’.

Some critics have drawn comparisons between this movie and ‘Taken’ but I don’t see it at all. There’s a vulnerability with Neeson’s character in ‘A Walk Among The Tombstones’ and it’s a somewhat refreshing performance from him.

However, if you’ve seen the trailer for the movie then you’re more or less privy to what happens. There’s quite a shocking moment about half way through the movie when a character does something very unexpected but if you’ve seen the trailer you know what’s coming.

There’s also the introduction of young character by the name of T.J. (Brian ‘Astro’ Bradley). T.J. and Scudder partake in some quite comical exchanges and whilst I did laugh, I found that it was completely unnecessary.

‘A Walk Among The Tombstones’ struggles to decide what type of film it wants to be and as a direct result it lacks bite any great moment of substance.

David Harbour, who plays one of the murders, is so unbelievably sarcastic and funny when he’s not supposed to be that I found myself totally confused as to what was happening.

Scott Frank’s direction is worth mentioning as a positive and Mihai Malaimare Jr’s cinematography is impressive but a walk along the quay beside Sainsbury’s would be time better spent.

‘A Walk Among The Tombstones’ is currently showing at the Brunswick Moviebowl.