The staggering amount councils made from parking tickets this year

The staggering amount councils made from parking tickets this year
The staggering amount councils made from parking tickets this year

The surplus produced from council parking operations in England rose by 10 per cent over the past year, according to a new study.

Some £819m was generated from the on and off-street parking activities of the 353 local authorities in England during the 2016/17 financial year, research found.

It represents a 10 per cent leap on the 2015/16 surplus of £744m. Figures also show income was up 6 per cent and costs rose 2 per cent.

The figures were submitted by councils to the Department for Communities and Local Government.

Transport boost

Most councils make a surplus on their parking activities, and this is to be spent on local transport projects.

Many of the highest totals were in London, with Westminster having the largest surplus (£73.2m) followed by Kensington and Chelsea (£32.2 m) and Camden (£26.8m).

Outside of London the biggest surpluses were Brighton and Hove (£21.2m), Milton Keynes and Birmingham (£11.1m each).

RAC Foundation director Steve Gooding said: “The silver lining for drivers is that these surpluses must almost exclusively be ploughed back into transport.”

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