From the archive: Malin Head widow who has never been on a bus or train turns 100 - January 1968

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100 years old this weekend

An Inishowen widow who has never been seriously ill in her life and who is at present enjoying the best of health will be 100 on Sunday next.

She intends to celebrate the occasion with a reunion and the handing over of the customary £5 from the President, Eamon de Valera.

She is Mrs. Betty Logue, living with relatives at Clogheen, Malin Head. Her husband, Mr. Cormac Logue, a farmer, of Carnamalin, died two years ago at the age of 98. They were married in 1914 at the Star of the Sea Church, Malin Head, the officiating priest being the late Father McMenamin. They had no family. She has never been on a bus or train.

Daring republican raid recalled

Fifty years ago, on January 4, 1918, to be exact - the Rosses thrilled to the exploits of four young Republicans who, unarmed, held up a British military escort and forced them to hand over two prisoners they were taking to Derry.

The prisoners were two young soldiers home from the war who had decided that their duty lay in fighting for Ireland rather than for England on the battlefields of France.

The Kincasslagh Rd. Station ambush, as it became known was probably the first engagement with the British Army in the War of Independence , certainly many months before Soloheadbeag.

Marquee dancing a ‘must’

District Justice W.A. Tormey told ballroom owners in Inishowen that while he had a certain amount of sympathy with them if dance marquees were interfering with their livelihood, it seemed that it had now reached a stage where marquee dancing was an absolute ‘must’ with the younger generation.

He was dealing with objections lodged by the owners to applications for licence for marquees at Moville and Carndonagh. He granted applications by John Fullerton, on behalf of a number of organisations in Moville, and by the Carndonagh Carnival Committee, for licences for one month in the coming summer.