Exit

‘Exit’ is the buzzword just now. Wales showed Northern Ireland the way out. Then the Republic hit the road after the game against France. Last Monday Roy Hodgson and the English team had to make their way home.

‘Exit’ is the buzzword just now. Wales showed Northern Ireland the way out. Then the Republic hit the road after the game against France. Last Monday Roy Hodgson and the English team had to make their way home.

But to crown it all, we had Brexit last week. I like the new Irish word: ‘Bréalú’- Breatain+ éalú (to escape). Congratulations to whoever made it up. And David Cameron resigned. There is a new version of the old First World War song out now: ‘It’s a long way to kick a Tory’. Some members of the Labour Party would like to see Jeremy Corbyn’s back. Do they prefer the liar they had a few years back to the honest, sincere man they have now?

There has been much discussion of the implications of the exit for this country. We were told that people would be able to travel throughout the island without any problem. But we were told very little about goods. The cat is among the pigeons now. Will goods be able to move between the two states tax-free? What about the mortgages of those who live in the South, but who work in the North? Will we be going back to the old days when farmers trained their cows to walk over the border backwards? Will granny go to jail for trying to smuggle a dozen eggs from one side of the border to the other? And, seriously, what about security at the border? These are some of the questions that have to be discussed.

It is very disturbing that certain Members of Parliament used the Referendum as a political tool in their leadership disputes, instead of thinking about the good of the people. I admit there are two sides to the argument. I am just saying that they should have been presented to us honestly.