The Doc’s Prescription - Patience running out at Parkhead

Celtic's manager Neil Lennon during the Clydesdale Bank Scottish Premier League match at Celtic Park, Glasgow. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday October 24, 2010. Photo credit should read: Lynne Cameron/PA Wire. **EDITORIAL USE ONLY**
Celtic's manager Neil Lennon during the Clydesdale Bank Scottish Premier League match at Celtic Park, Glasgow. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday October 24, 2010. Photo credit should read: Lynne Cameron/PA Wire. **EDITORIAL USE ONLY**

Celtic MAY be struggling on the football pitch at the moment but on the publicity front they are miles ahead of all opposition.

Every time I’ve lifted a newspaper over the last six weeks it’s been to read that either manager, Neil Lennon or one of his players is exhorting the ‘Bhoys’ to do better, to live up to their potential or that absolute classic; “to take a good look at themselves.”

Has it ever occurred to Lennon or his players that the long suffering fans want to see improvement on the pitch, not read about what they could do in one of the dailies?

Celtic fans have been incredibly patient, almost certainly because of Lennon’s passion for the club but how much longer can that last?

There is no doubt that Lennon has been very unlucky with injuries to key players but again that won’t protect him if this season ends in failure.

As a manager, even if results aren’t going for you, the fans have to believe that you know what you are doing.

If there is a plan and fans can see that, then they will back you but that doesn’t seem to be the case at Celtic at the moment.

The constant chopping and changing of centre-backs is a case in point as the manager doesn’t seem to know his best defensive pairing.

Another thing that is keeping the pressure off Lennon is the belief among ‘Hoops’ fans that arch-rivals and league leaders, Rangers aren’t that good and can be caught. This of course is easy to say but might be more difficult to achieve.

The rumblings of discontent are there and it’s up to the manager and his players to silence them with results on the field and not with sound-bites.