Kabosh’s new play ‘Before You Go’ at The Playhouse in Derry

Before You Go, a new play from Kabosh written by Laurence McKeown and directed by Paula McFetridge, which got its first showing online during the pandemic, is set to arrive at the Playhouse in Derry.

Lisa Duffy, Eimear Fearon, and James Doran in Before You Go. Photo Ciaran Dunbar.
Lisa Duffy, Eimear Fearon, and James Doran in Before You Go. Photo Ciaran Dunbar.

A play about the fragility of love explores the themes of love, loss and living, Before You Go will be performed at The Playhouse, Artillery Street on Thursday, March 31 at 8pm.

Set in Carlingford in the present day, Before You Go tells the story of 22 year-old Sorcha O’Hagan (Eimear Fearon), who is leaving for Australia. Her bags are packed and only an overdue conversation with her father remains.

Sorcha’s mother (Lisa Duffy) died when she was only 18 months old.  She was raised by her father Brendan (James Doran) and his family. They had a strong relationship, but his regular absenteeism was never talked about. As the sun rises on the border, the clock is ticking, and things need to be said...

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Director Paula McFetridge said: “We initially presented Before You Go online, right in the midst of pandemic. The regulations at the time meant we had to rehearse via Zoom, and record in a ventilated studio in the middle of winter, with filming taking place remotely – we just had the three actors in the room. Despite the restrictions, the power of Laurence’s words and our cast’s performance remained in full force. A year later, we can’t wait to take this wonderful piece on tour across the country, and for audiences to experience the power of live theatre once again.”

Playwright Laurence McKeown added: “Before You Go looks at the difficulties of communicating with those who are closest to us and the consequences of not saying what we should while there is still time. I have two daughters who are around the same age as Sorcha so I understand the need for intrafamily and cross-generational dialogue. Everyone has a past and I believe that the only way we ever move forward, whether as a family, a relationship, or as a society, is by people being prepared to speak openly about their past and others being prepared to listen.”

Caoileann Curry-Thompson, Acting Head of Drama and Dance at the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, commented: “The experience of live theatre is something we’ve all very much missed over the past two years, so it is great to see them back, doing what they do best, using theatre as a tool to tell stories and create dialogue about society and our collective history.”

The play is sutiable for aged 14 and above. To book tickets telephone 02871268027 or log on to www.derryplayhouse.co.uk