Scaling Muckish for ‘Tiny Tots’

From left to right, Enagh Youth Forum members and leaders Keasley, Cara, Dion, Paul, Steven, Kerrie, Matthew, Paddy and Shauna.
From left to right, Enagh Youth Forum members and leaders Keasley, Cara, Dion, Paul, Steven, Kerrie, Matthew, Paddy and Shauna.

Members of the Enagh Youth Forum in Strathfoyle joined the ‘Friends of Tiny Tots Community Play Group’ last weekend to scale the formidable Muckish Mountain in Donegal to help raise funds for the playgroup.

So far the climb, which took place on Saturday, November 24, has raised £300, with more sponsorship still to be collected over the coming days.

Explaining why they had come together to undertake the trip, Paul Hughes from Enagh Youth Forum said: “Tiny Tots Community Play Group provide an essential service to the local community and is currently struggling financially and are worried about its future.

“It’s up to all of us to do what we can to support the group and keep ‘Tiny Tots’ from closing its doors next year!”

Dion Coyle, one of the young participants on the climb, added: “It was a great day on Saturday and definitely a bit easier than last years climb to Errigal which we did in the snow. We all need to do what we can to help keep Tiny Tots open!”

Elaine Donaghy, Tiny Tots Centre Manager said: “We have been overwhelmed by the support from the local community. This builds on a successful Coffee Morning which was held by the Strathfoyle Peace Bytes Group which took place last month.

“I would like to thank Enagh Youth Forum and everyone who took part in Saturday’s climb. It really is much appreciated.”

The climbers thanked Adventure Sports North West for guiding them safely up the mountain.

Meanwhile, anyone interested in organising a charity event in support of ‘Tiny Tots’ can get in touch with Elaine Donaghy, or if you would like to donate to the Muckish climb charity pot please get in touch with Enagh Youth Forum or Tiny Tots.

Muckish (Pig’s Back in Irish) is a flat-topped mountain in the Derryveagh Mountains rising to a height of 2,189 ft, as part of a mountain chain called the ‘Seven Sisters’ locally.

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