The Age of Adaline - Film Review

Actress Blake Lively with co-star Michiel Huisman on the set of 'The Age of Adaline'.
Actress Blake Lively with co-star Michiel Huisman on the set of 'The Age of Adaline'.

‘The Age of Adaline’ could have and should have been so much better.

In the case of director, Lee Toland Krieger, (‘Celeste and Jesse Forever’) he fails to maximise the film’s potential.

The movie is about a woman called Adaline who stops ageing and has spent the last 80 years stuck on the lovely age of 29.

You’d think with this premise that we would get a film as far reaching and as diverse as David Fincher’s ‘The Curious Case of Benjamin Button’ but not so.

Adaline (Blake Lively - ‘The Town’ and ‘Savages’) is born at the turn of the 20th century and develops her agelessness after an incident.

A while later, Adaline meets Ellis Jones (Michael Huisman - ‘Treme’ and ‘Game of Thrones’) and falls deeply in love with him.

The only person aware of what happened to Adaline is her daughter Flemming (Ellen Burstyn - ‘The Exorcist’ and ‘Interstellar’) but when Adaline meets Ellis she starts to reconsider how she will spend her immortality.

In the present day, despite being well over 100 years old, Adaline does not look a day over 29.

Like all films of this nature, it requires you to suspend disbelief and as soon as that is out of the way the film comes to life.

The love story between Adaline and Ellis is well presented and the performances from both Lively and Huisman are impressive. Be that as it may, it’s not at all plausible that the most interesting thing to happen to someone gifted with immortality is that she falls in love.

Blake Lively in 'The Age of Adaline'.

Blake Lively in 'The Age of Adaline'.

At least with Fincher’s film ‘The Curious Case of Benjamin Button’ he travelled the world and met interesting people. For someone with an extraordinary gift, Adaline leads a very ordinary life, which is a little disappointing.

One of the most impressive aspects of this film is its cinematography.

David Lanzenberg worked as director of photography on Lee Toland Krieger’s Indie hit movie, ‘Celeste and Jesse Forever’ and it’s easy to see why he has kept him around.

Lanzenberg’s framing of the film is absolutely exquisite and gives extra depth to the already deep feeling sense of emotion between Adaline and those she loves.

At least with Fincher’s film ‘The Curious Case of Benjamin Button’ he travelled the world and met interesting people. For someone with an extraordinary gift, Adaline leads a very ordinary life, which is a little disappointing

Derry Journal film critic - Andrew Quinn

The premise of one person being gifted mortality while all those around them age and die has been done before.

The concept is an interesting one and whilst ‘The Age of Adaline’ is decent addition to this movie sub-genre it is by no means the best.

It’s a coming of age film for the likes of Lively and Huisman who have found themselves on the fringes in many of their previous outings.

‘The Age of Adaline’ is a fair attempt at a love story which requires the audience to suspend disbelief however there are much more enjoyable films currently showing at cinemas so when it comes to this film perhaps you would be better placed to wait for a while and rent it.

VERDICT: 3/5 - Lee Toland Krieger’s film could have and should have been much better. It’s implausible to think that the most exciting thing to happen to a woman gifted with immortality is that she falls in love. Be that as it may, the love story between Adaline (Lively) and Jones (Huisaman) is uplifting and Lanzenberg’s cinematography is top class.