Storm names for 2022/3 winter season released

Met Éireann along with the Dutch and British meteorological services have released the new list of storm names for the 2022/23 storm season.

The full list for 2022/23 is: Antoni, Betty, Cillian, Daisy, Elliot, Fleur, Glen, Hendrika, Íde, Johanna, Khalid, Loes, Mark, Nelly, Owain, Priya, Ruadhán, Sam, Tobias, Val and Wouter.

Since 2015 Met Éireann and the UK Met Office have been working together in a Storm Names partnership to help raise awareness of the potential impacts of severe weather and were joined by KMNI (Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute) in 2019.

Storms are named when they could cause ‘medium’ or ‘high’ impacts in one of the partner countries and help provide consistent, authoritative messaging in times of severe weather.

Storm Eunice as it battered Portstewart earlier this year. Photo: Kirth Ferris/ Pacemaker

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Evelyn Cusack, Head of Forecasting Division in Met Éireann, welcomes storm naming as a very important tool in National Met Services’ warnings arsenal. She says: ‘The annual unveiling of the new storm names on September 1 creates greater public awareness and, crucially, during the winter when a storm is named for its potential Orange/Red impacts, it creates a more impactful public ‘call to action’ helping to save lives and property.

"During past storms, the public have responded positively to the advice given by experts and this new roster of names will help us to continue to mobilise everyone to ensure we all work to minimise the effects of future events.”

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Head of Forecasting KNMI, Jan Rozema: “Chances are very high that severe storms will affect all three countries involved: Ireland, the UK and The Netherlands. News on severe weather is not limited to national boundaries, so the message to UK, Irish and Dutch inhabitants will be much appreciated and understood if we share the same information, starting with storm names.

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"This year we had a good example: three named storms affected the Netherlands within a week. A rare red warning was issued for storm Eunice, one of the most severe storms in fifty years. Storms Dudley and Franklin also brought significant weather impacts. For us at KNMI, it is a great privilege and advantage to work in close co-operation with our colleagues from Ireland and the UK in the communication about storms.”

Met Office Head of Situational Awareness Will Lang, who leads responses in times of severe weather, said: “We know from seven years of doing this that naming storms works. Last year, Storms Arwen and Eunice brought some severe impacts to the UK and we know that naming storms helps to raise awareness and give the public the information they need to stay safe in times of severe weather.

"Recent impactful storms demonstrated our ongoing need to communicate severe weather in a clear way to help the public protect themselves. Naming storms is just one way that we know helps to raise awareness of severe weather and provides clarity for the public when they need it most.”